This 11 Year Old Nails the Problem with Our Food System

food system

The food industry separated us light years away from the good old personal relationship we had with the food we eat. From fresh, organic and locally grown food that we used to consume just a few decades ago, we now have to recognize the food we eat by the color of the boxes in the grocery store. Organic food is typically more expensive, and in many cases the food was flown to our local grocery store from another country, sometimes even a different continent.

Unless you belong to the small group of privileged individuals who can still enjoy the rich flavors of food recently harvested from your own backyard, most likely you deserve healthier and more natural food than what you get. A revolution is in the making and all of us should be taking a part in it.

Watch this fantastic 5-minute talk by the 11 year old Birke Baehr about some of the problems of our food system.

 

  • inbal

    Great Article and Great video 🙂 Can I adopt this kid?

  • Aldo

    It is a great proposal, I’m all in for organic foods. However some financial questioning must be put in place.

    I too would love to have cows eating grass and walking around for as much as they want. However would I like to pay perhaps 3 times as much for meat? Oh wait, I can afford that, but what about people who can barely pay for the actual price?.

    Genetically modified seeds are also a matter of controversy. Look must vaccines have been developed under trial schemes. Most times they didn’t work, but that one time they did, they saved millions of lives.

    Genetically modified seeds/crops are not carried out by some evil Frankestein scientists trying to dominate the world. They actually have good business purposes but hey! these same business purposes serve society purposes.
    For instance a gen modified crop that bears insect plagues better could result in fewer crop loses (great for business yeah!) but also great for ensuring supply levels and preventing prices from skyrocketing.

    I believe putting all technological efforts in the group and naming them “corporate interests” lacks reality and weakens the argument for questioning some corporations putting money on top of health issues for its consumers.

    I agree that we need more regulation, but we must keep on investigating.

    I agree that ideally cows and pigs should all live in happy farms, but.. are we ready to carry out some serious population growth control? Or ready to pay a lot more for meat? or become vegetarians?

    Don’t get me wrong, Im all in for food safety. But hey cars, planes, etc were a lot more dangerous 100 years ago and should we have stopped their improvement we would probably live in a 19th century society.

    We can’t deny engine transportation, we can’t deny progress. We just need to focus our effort towards “safe progress”.

    Regards,

    • yaron

      Hey there.

      You are pinpointing the exact issues with this topic.
      On one hand we want to keep food safe and as healthy as possible. But on the other, in certain cases it is not even clear what safe / healthy is.
      That is why we should keep investigating and probably regulate as much as possible. In particular food labeling should be regulated to be as informative as possible (see for example http://www.labelgmos.org/).
      In my opinion we should minimize consumption of food if we don’t have convincing evidence for its safety. Also, the public should be educated as much as possible about these topics and people should make their own choices. Clearly, the financial aspect is a big factor and will be taken into account individually. However, I do believe that the more empowered people will be (in terms of knowledge about the food they purchase and eat), the more inclined they will be make better food choices. Then demand and supply should reduce prices of healthy food (as has already been happening in the last 5 years).

      You raised many of the most important questions that should be addressed. Especially by the public – so thank you for this great comment.